Updates

Victory for Newport's harbor and beaches.

Newport’s harbor and beaches are on the road to recovery after years of illegal pollution from Middletown and Newport. In 2007 our staff joined local citizens to file a Clean Water Act citizens’ suit against the towns to stop their pollution. In 2010 and 2011, we won strong settlements requiring the towns to clean up their act.

Report | Environment America

America’s Next Top Polluter

Tyson Foods, Inc. is “one of the world’s largest producers of meat and poultry.” The company’s pollution footprint includes manure from its contract growers’ factory farm operations, fertilizer runoff from grain grown to feed the livestock it brings to market as meat, and waste from its processing plants.

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News Release | Environment America

Northeast & Mid-Atlantic states can lead the nation to a clean energy future

WILMINGTON, DEL. – On Tuesday, stakeholders from nine northeastern states will gather for the first time after the Paris Climate Agreement to discuss potential improvements to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the nation’s first multi-state program to limit global warming pollution from power plants.

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Blog Post

Why we need the Clean Water Rule | John Rumpler

Why do we need federal protection under the Clean Water Act if there are also state laws designed to protect our rivers and streams? The answer is that, all too often, state officials fail to enforce their own laws or side with politically-powerful polluters.

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Report | Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center

Turning to the Wind

Wind power continues to grow as a source of clean energy across America. The United States generated 26 times more electricity from wind power in 2014 than it did in 2001. American wind power has already significantly reduced global warming pollution.

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News Release | Environment Rhode Island

Report: wind could produce enough power to reduce pollution from over 384,097 cars

Providence, Rhode Island – Speeding development of offshore wind, for which Rhode Island has vast potential, could cut vast amounts of pollution. Carbon pollution equal to that produced by as many as 384,097 cars could be eliminated by 2020 with a moderate growth in wind power off the coast of Rhode Island, a new report from Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center said today.

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